Business Hilights
Tracking Nigeria's Headline Business News Online

Advert space

Fixing of software that facilitated Boeing 737 Max 8 nose-diving habit underway, but…

Fresh credible angle as to the preliminary cause of the Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed last month killing 157 passengers on board has revealed that nose-dived several times before hitting the ground.
In a statement copied to Business Hilights Nigeria from the Airline, the report suggests that the pilots who were commanding the Flight ET 302 on March 10, 2019 followed all the Boeing recommended and FAA approved emergency procedures to handle the most difficult emergency situation created on the airplane, but could not recover.
“Despite their hard work and full compliance with the emergency procedures, it was very unfortunate that they could not recover the airplane from the persistence of nose diving,” the release added.
Already, sources at Boeing in USA confided in our medium that the software setting in Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 linked to the observed cases of hiccups leading to abrupt nose-diving is being identified and will be fixed within a space of time.
The courses also hinted the chances of completing the crisis resolution as soon as possible and further assured that the aircraft brand may recover its lost global credibility and fly worldwide again after safety checks before the end the year.
Giving more emphasis, the Group CEO of Ethiopian Airlines, Tewolde GebreMariam commended the pilots who equally lost their lives for following the emergency procedures and exhibiting high professionalism.
According to him, “All of us at Ethiopian Airlines are still going through deep mourning for the loss of our loved ones and we would like to express our deep sympathy and condolences for the families, relatives and friends of the victims. Meanwhile; we are very proud of our pilots’ compliances to follow the emergency procedures and high level of professional performances in such extremely difficult situations.”
Recall that Flight ET302 on a scheduled flight to Nairobi, crashed few minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa. Eight flight crew and 149 passengers were killed in the accident.
Besides, it was the second crash in the space of less than six months involving a Boeing 737 Max aircraft. In October 2018 a Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed into the sea near Indonesia killing all of the 189 people on board.
Currently, all 737 Max 8 aircraft have been grounded in the wake of the crashes even as efforts are ongoing to fix the software issues hobbling the brand.